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Can CAC Recommend Conservation Products That They Deem Acceptable? Does CAC Conserve Coins They Buy?

Goddard's Silver Dip, MS70 Coin Brightener, etc.? What do they recommend for each of these metals: copper, silver, gold, aluminum, and nickel? 
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Comments

  • Just an FYI - CAC is NOT a fan of the MS70 look on copper. Dipping is a matter of degree and more acceptable on higher grades.
  • But NGC loves the fake purplish look that results from an MS70 bath. PCGS (usually) hates it. 
  • edited January 5
    CACfan said:
    But NGC loves the fake purplish look that results from an MS70 bath. PCGS (usually) hates it. 
    Unfortunately, PCGS has been letting some of these slide through. Look at some of the recent BN MPLs on coinfacts for 1909, 1911, 1912, 1913, 1915, & 1916. I don't believe any of these are CAC'd.
  • CACfan said:
    But NGC loves the fake purplish look that results from an MS70 bath. PCGS (usually) hates it. 
    And PCGS coins usually fetch a premium over NGC coins. Try selling a sticker less NGC coin for a fair price on an expensive issue.
  • But those PCGS mattes often have 100% natural toning that mimics the fake stuff. The way to tell doctored versus not is to view mattes at different angles. If they always look purplish, the were MS70'd. If they look brownish at some angles, the toning is natural and a result of contact with the sulfur-laden tissues and/or holders in which they were stored. 
  • CACfan said:
    But those PCGS mattes often have 100% natural toning that mimics the fake stuff. The way to tell doctored versus not is to view mattes at different angles. If they always look purplish, the were MS70'd. If they look brownish at some angles, the toning is natural and a result of contact with the sulfur-laden tissues and/or holders in which they were stored. 
    I didn’t mean to imply for instance that all blue copper was AT and I would never take such a position. The electric blues and electric purples are the concerning ones. Once you’ve seen several in hand, you’ll understand what I am talking about. I’m probably doing a poor job explaining it.

    Thoughts on a better way to explain? @MarkFeld @Legend @JACAC.
  • CACfan said:
    But NGC loves the fake purplish look that results from an MS70 bath. PCGS (usually) hates it. 
    And PCGS coins usually fetch a premium over NGC coins. Try selling a sticker less NGC coin for a fair price on an expensive issue.
    And try crossing over any NGC copper coin (even a CAC) to a PCGS slab. I have wasted untold thousands of dollars in fees playing that lottery. But the very few that hit offset the losses many times over. 

    Fun fact: the same coin in a PCGS slab is many times more likely to be CAC'd than when it was in an NGC slab. Even JA is subconsciously influenced. 
  • edited January 7
    CACfan said:
    But those PCGS mattes often have 100% natural toning that mimics the fake stuff. The way to tell doctored versus not is to view mattes at different angles. If they always look purplish, the were MS70'd. If they look brownish at some angles, the toning is natural and a result of contact with the sulfur-laden tissues and/or holders in which they were stored. 
    I didn’t mean to imply for instance that all blue copper was AT and I would never take such a position. The electric blues and electric purples are the concerning ones. Once you’ve seen several in hand, you’ll understand what I am talking about. I’m probably doing a poor job explaining it.

    Thoughts on a better way to explain? @MarkFeld @Legend @JACAC.
    Russy brought up the matte proof Lincolns. I have seen plenty in hand. Some original mattes have electric blue. But purple is a different story. Also, MS70 usually diminishes the cartwheel luster. The only conservation of mattes should be the use of an innocuous compound to get rid of the gunk. The color should be left alone. I have conserved many myself. But it is VERY risky. You never know what is under the gunk. 
  • edited January 7
    They recommend nothing. They advise nothing. And that's always been clear.

    Why is this about blue copper? Whatever does this have to do with CAC operations or standards?
    @CAC_Team can and should make a definitive response to any such posts....

    In this instance, the responses would be
    No
    No
    Thread question marked "answered" and thread locked.

    DO NOT FEED THE TROLL
  • Why such rage (LOL)? PCGS and NGC conserve coins, so some dealers and collectors wonder whether CAC might.
  • edited January 7
    :'(

    DO NOT FEED THE TROLL
  • CACfan said:

    But NGC loves the fake purplish look that results from an MS70 bath. PCGS (usually) hates it. 

    Sorry, I think that’s bologna. They reject many such coins.
  • CACfan said:
    CACfan said:
    But NGC loves the fake purplish look that results from an MS70 bath. PCGS (usually) hates it. 
    And PCGS coins usually fetch a premium over NGC coins. Try selling a sticker less NGC coin for a fair price on an expensive issue.
    And try crossing over any NGC copper coin (even a CAC) to a PCGS slab. I have wasted untold thousands of dollars in fees playing that lottery. But the very few that hit offset the losses many times over. 

    Fun fact: the same coin in a PCGS slab is many times more likely to be CAC'd than when it was in an NGC slab. Even JA is subconsciously influenced. 
    Why is it so difficult to cross NGC copper to PCGS? Even with a CAC?
  • Stevie said:


    CACfan said:




    CACfan said:

    But NGC loves the fake purplish look that results from an MS70 bath. PCGS (usually) hates it. 

    And PCGS coins usually fetch a premium over NGC coins. Try selling a sticker less NGC coin for a fair price on an expensive issue.

    And try crossing over any NGC copper coin (even a CAC) to a PCGS slab. I have wasted untold thousands of dollars in fees playing that lottery. But the very few that hit offset the losses many times over. 

    Fun fact: the same coin in a PCGS slab is many times more likely to be CAC'd than when it was in an NGC slab. Even JA is subconsciously influenced. 

    Why is it so difficult to cross NGC copper to PCGS? Even with a CAC?

    My take on this is PCGS is very leery of copper coins in an NGC slab. Years ago, I learned very quickly to avoid copper coin in an NGC slab especially in the post JA era.
    Firstly, the NGC plastic has traditionally been thicker than the PCGS plastic which makes viewing more difficult in the holder.

    Secondly, the somewhat older post JA era NGC slabs has the edge of the coin wrapped completely with the white core. Again, it makes viewing more difficult in the holder.

    Thirdly, even with CAC stickering, poorly maintained storage of copper coins can affect the ability of the copper coin to cross.

    There are other reasons but it is time for lunch and I am hungry.
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