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Adjustment marks, Any CAC stickered coins?

edited January 11 in Grading
 I love early silver dollars! 
   Flowing hair and bust dollars are my main focus.  Unfortunately, many of these coins have mint made adjustment marks. Are they still worthy of a CAC sticker? I have even seen some early gold coins with adjustment marks.  I think they add character,  part of the coins history. I  wonder  how CAC views them and how do you view these coins?  Are they worthy of a green sticker??
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Comments

  • I can't imagine that suitably nice quality examples would fail to sticker - without or with adjustment marks.
  • I personally don’t care for adjustment marks if they are in a focal area of the coin, but I don’t get the impression that adjustment marks would cause CAC to not sticker a nice quality coin. I have seen plenty of early gold examples with heavy adjustment marks that have stickers.
  • I personally don’t care for adjustment marks if they are in a focal area of the coin, but I don’t get the impression that adjustment marks would cause CAC to not sticker a nice quality coin. I have seen plenty of early gold examples with heavy adjustment marks that have stickers.
    Did they have adjustment marks on the obverse devices or just close to the rim?  Seems like towards the rim  of the coin they would be less noticeable? Wondering if the location of the marks would make a difference?
  • Here is a tough CAC bust half I traded awhile back with a friend that has adjustment marks on the upper left reverse field. I personally don’t think they took away from the coin. 



  • I agree, the coin still looks great! The adjustment marks kinda add a cool, unique look to the coin....
  • Looks like some more adjustment marks around the arrow heads.
  • The impact of adjustment marks on both value, slab grade, CAC and plain old aesthetic appeal depends upon 1. the location of the adj marks ie on the periphery or on eagle/ Liberty head
    2. The extent of the adj marks - minimal or extensive 3. whether the adj mks are all in 1 direction or criss-crossed ( ugh ) 4. whether other identical coins are found w/o adj marks or whether most similar or identical coins are filed 5. the absolute rarity or popularity of the coin ie 1794 dollars 6. the actual grade of the coin ie if it is gem Unc or just g-vg 7.how much of the coin’s detail is effaced or missing due to adj marks. So you see, there are many factors affecting the appeal and value and CAC effect of adjustment marks. By the way, I have serious doubts there are legit adj marks on 1820 onward Bust halves, at least post -striking.
  • edited January 13
    I don't think those are adjustment marks (which are rarely perfectly straight and parallel). Looks more like roller marks from the mill.
    Lance.

    edit: I am wrong to say adjustment marks are rarely straight and parallel. They usually are, though sometimes in different directions. Still, the multiple lines in the 1814 half -- at the start of the scroll and from the arrow heads into the motto, at opposite ends of the coin and all perfectly parallel -- resemble rolling mill marks.
  • I don't think those are adjustment marks (which are rarely perfectly straight and parallel). Looks more like roller marks from the mill. Lance.
     Interesting, you probably are right...
  • Interesting. I've seen this 1901 Morgan w/ planchet adjustment marks (not mine). Does anybody know when the US Mint stopped the practice?

    PS, for followup, are these really adjustment marks on this 1901?

    PSS @drddm really nice CBH, regardless of the mark.


  • That’s ridiculous that PCGS diagnosed the 1901 cleaned Morgan dollar as having “ pin adjustment marks “ . And that three graders agreed with that. Those slide marks are from carrying in one’s pocket or sliding it across a bar or rough surface or keeping in a jewelry box, etc.
    It’s DAMAGED. Gad !
  • I don’t think those 1901 marks are from sliding across anything. They’re very parallel and long. I agree I don’t think they look like what we normally see as adjustment marks. Question still stands; When did the mint stop manually adjusting planchets and subsequently producing Adjustment Marks??? 



  • I don't know where PCGS came up with that "planchet adjustment marks" diagnosis. Well, actually I do. Fred Weinberg owns up. He has since agreed that "planchet roller marks" is a better description. Read about it here:

    https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/1019328/planchet-adjustment-marks

    Adjustment marks were pretty much done by 1800.
    Lance.
  • WilliamJ said:
    Did they have adjustment marks on the obverse devices or just close to the rim?  Seems like towards the rim  of the coin they would be less noticeable? Wondering if the location of the marks would make a difference?
    This Heritage link is to an example of a very nice 1806 HE with CAC approval that has heavy adjustment marks in the center of the reverse. 
  • I bet that 1901 Morgan could bring some good money at auction today.
  • WilliamJ said:
    Did they have adjustment marks on the obverse devices or just close to the rim?  Seems like towards the rim  of the coin they would be less noticeable? Wondering if the location of the marks would make a difference?
    This Heritage link is to an example of a very nice 1806 HE with CAC approval that has heavy adjustment marks in the center of the reverse. 
    Nice looking coin even with the adjustment marks, kinda cool!
  • I don’t think those 1901 marks are from sliding across anything. They’re very parallel and long. I agree I don’t think they look like what we normally see as adjustment marks. Question still stands; When did the mint stop manually adjusting planchets and subsequently producing Adjustment Marks??? 




    Whether one chooses to call them "adjustment marks" or "roller marks", they sure don't look they are man-made slide marks.
  • This one is CAC approved; a dealer described this top left line as an adjustment mark.  It is strange-looking though, but I feel like if PCGS/CAC thought it was PMD it wouldn’t have straight graded, let alone stickered.  Thoughts?

      

    The line is a negative to be sure, but the surfaces are outstanding otherwise and I still love the coin. 

  • edited January 14
    On the 1807, the mark is clearly not anywhere as deep over the devices (star and bow), however transverses and appears on either side of both. That could lend itself to assessing that the mark was maybe on the planchet prior to strike. I'd be interested in others opinions. 


  • It does look like it was there prior to strike. Seems like if it were an adjustment mark that there would be other marks,  but maybe not? 
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