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GC or DLRC For inexpensive coins

Do you think I would do better with Great Collections and their 95% net of sale with a BP of 12.5% or DLRC with a BP of 0% but net of only 85%. Was considering selling a few nice type uncirculated PCGS CAC coins under $400? I would consign no reserve in any case. I welcome any of your feedback. These are the coins.

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Comments

  • You can’t go by the bp and sellers fee and other expense numbers (which in this case are close), and the fact that GC has more “eyeballs” than DLRC also doesn’t mean anything, since not everyone looking at GC looks at every one of the thousands of coins GC posts weekly. People use the excellent filters offered by both GC and DLRC to look ONLY AT the coins they have interest in. I personally look at both of those sites religiously EVERY week, but filter down to only the coins I might be interested in,

    The bottom line on where you’ll have the best success - absolutely pure luck! What you want are at least two buyers who really want your coin, and are willing to spend $ to get it. There’s no way to predict which site has a better chance of producing that result.

    As a collector, I sell the coins from my sets that get upgraded, and I’ve used both GC and DLRC. Virtually every coin I’ve sold had a green CAC, and I’ve had mixed results from each of those two venues. Sometimes good results, sometimes disastrous. Word of caution from my limited experience - be cautious about using no reserve. I’ve done it both ways with both of those firms. Again, sometimes with good results at each firm, BUT whenever I’ve had a disastrous result from each, it was always when there was no reserve.

    Finally, I strongly suggest not going with no reserve on your coins with no CAC’s, regardless of which firm you go with, especially since you’ve indicated these coins are valued at less than $400 or so. For your two coins with gold CAC’s, I think you’ll do great at either firm, even with no reserve. Coins graded by PCGS with gold CAC’s are HOT!!!!

    Good luck!

    Steve
  • You can’t go by the bp and sellers fee and other expense numbers (which in this case are close), and the fact that GC has more “eyeballs” than DLRC also doesn’t mean anything, since not everyone looking at GC looks at every one of the thousands of coins GC posts weekly. People use the excellent filters offered by both GC and DLRC to look ONLY AT the coins they have interest in. I personally look at both of those sites religiously EVERY week, but filter down to only the coins I might be interested in,

    The bottom line on where you’ll have the best success - absolutely pure luck! What you want are at least two buyers who really want your coin, and are willing to spend $ to get it. There’s no way to predict which site has a better chance of producing that result.

    As a collector, I sell the coins from my sets that get upgraded, and I’ve used both GC and DLRC. Virtually every coin I’ve sold had a green CAC, and I’ve had mixed results from each of those two venues. Sometimes good results, sometimes disastrous. Word of caution from my limited experience - be cautious about using no reserve. I’ve done it both ways with both of those firms. Again, sometimes with good results at each firm, BUT whenever I’ve had a disastrous result from each, it was always when there was no reserve.

    Finally, I strongly suggest not going with no reserve on your coins with no CAC’s, regardless of which firm you go with, especially since you’ve indicated these coins are valued at less than $400 or so. For your two coins with gold CAC’s, I think you’ll do great at either firm, even with no reserve. Coins graded by PCGS with gold CAC’s are HOT!!!!

    Good luck!

    Steve

    I've found that quite often letting a non bean go for a "disatrous" bid can be a relief though.
  • Having said that, I consider lower price coins can move out better to a direct sale.
    .
  • Surprised you're parting with that "gold" Peace dollar about which you were most enthused!
  • edited June 11
    Catbert said:
    Surprised you're parting with that "gold" Peace dollar about which you were most enthused!
     No way. Only the Buffalo for now.I posted all my photos for the purposes of having a range of my coins to get a fair answer from forum members 
  • You can’t go by the bp and sellers fee and other expense numbers (which in this case are close), and the fact that GC has more “eyeballs” than DLRC also doesn’t mean anything, since not everyone looking at GC looks at every one of the thousands of coins GC posts weekly. People use the excellent filters offered by both GC and DLRC to look ONLY AT the coins they have interest in. I personally look at both of those sites religiously EVERY week, but filter down to only the coins I might be interested in, The bottom line on where you’ll have the best success - absolutely pure luck! What you want are at least two buyers who really want your coin, and are willing to spend $ to get it. There’s no way to predict which site has a better chance of producing that result. As a collector, I sell the coins from my sets that get upgraded, and I’ve used both GC and DLRC. Virtually every coin I’ve sold had a green CAC, and I’ve had mixed results from each of those two venues. Sometimes good results, sometimes disastrous. Word of caution from my limited experience - be cautious about using no reserve. I’ve done it both ways with both of those firms. Again, sometimes with good results at each firm, BUT whenever I’ve had a disastrous result from each, it was always when there was no reserve. Finally, I strongly suggest not going with no reserve on your coins with no CAC’s, regardless of which firm you go with, especially since you’ve indicated these coins are valued at less than $400 or so. For your two coins with gold CAC’s, I think you’ll do great at either firm, even with no reserve. Coins graded by PCGS with gold CAC’s are HOT!!!! Good luck! Steve
    I sure hope the sellers market is still strong , as I put up several Saints in ms 67 this week plus some others .  I usually notice we put a reserve but this time I didn’t notice any reserve .    I took a hit last week on ms 68 gold but luck would have it that HA was running a 68 + .   I hope these perform well , as I have another 18 coins in the CAC pipeline now after being graded by PCGS that I want to send through as well .   ( Funny thing is I really don’t know why I’m culling the herd .  I guess in my mind I want higher grade coin with the green bean .  So I’m making room I suppose 🤷🏻‍♂️ 🤓.   I think deep down I just felt like throwing Ian some business . ). 👍🏻🙏🏻

      Like you I’m upgrading some items , especially in my 12 gold CAC type set and my Saints .  The lesser get recycled by Great Collections .   


  • You can’t go by the bp and sellers fee and other expense numbers (which in this case are close), and the fact that GC has more “eyeballs” than DLRC also doesn’t mean anything, since not everyone looking at GC looks at every one of the thousands of coins GC posts weekly. People use the excellent filters offered by both GC and DLRC to look ONLY AT the coins they have interest in. I personally look at both of those sites religiously EVERY week, but filter down to only the coins I might be interested in,

    The bottom line on where you’ll have the best success - absolutely pure luck! What you want are at least two buyers who really want your coin, and are willing to spend $ to get it. There’s no way to predict which site has a better chance of producing that result.

    As a collector, I sell the coins from my sets that get upgraded, and I’ve used both GC and DLRC. Virtually every coin I’ve sold had a green CAC, and I’ve had mixed results from each of those two venues. Sometimes good results, sometimes disastrous. Word of caution from my limited experience - be cautious about using no reserve. I’ve done it both ways with both of those firms. Again, sometimes with good results at each firm, BUT whenever I’ve had a disastrous result from each, it was always when there was no reserve.

    Finally, I strongly suggest not going with no reserve on your coins with no CAC’s, regardless of which firm you go with, especially since you’ve indicated these coins are valued at less than $400 or so. For your two coins with gold CAC’s, I think you’ll do great at either firm, even with no reserve. Coins graded by PCGS with gold CAC’s are HOT!!!!

    Good luck!

    Steve

    I sure hope the sellers market is still strong , as I put up several Saints in ms 67 this week plus some others .  I usually notice we put a reserve but this time I didn’t notice any reserve .    I took a hit last week on ms 68 gold but luck would have it that HA was running a 68 + .   I hope these perform well , as I have another 18 coins in the CAC pipeline now after being graded by PCGS that I want to send through as well .   ( Funny thing is I really don’t know why I’m culling the herd .  I guess in my mind I want higher grade coin with the green bean .  So I’m making room I suppose 🤷🏻‍♂️ 🤓.   I think deep down I just felt like throwing Ian some business . ). 👍🏻🙏🏻

      Like you I’m upgrading some items , especially in my 12 gold CAC type set and my Saints .  The lesser get recycled by Great Collections .   


    “I usually notice we put a reserve but this time I didn’t notice any reserve .”

    I don’t understand what that means. If you’re the consignor, it should be your decision whether to sell reserved or unreserved. Who’s making the decisions for you?
  • My vote is for GC.
  • edited June 12
    I might consider consigning the two gold bean coins to GC. I’d see what CAC will offer on the others that stickered as you will take a bath after the auction house(s) take their commissions. I’d try flipping the others on the PCGS forum.
  • Hi Mark Feld

     After thinking about your question, I’d  have to say it was me .    

     I’ve noticed in coins and guns etc when you put a minimum bid that’s pretty high it often goes till the end with no bidding done.    Yet I’ve noticed the ones that start at $1 often draws a lot of bidders and finishes out better than what the other ones starting bid was.    
      The reserves I have used in the past were all easily surpassed .  Had they sold at those numbers it would have been disappointing.

     I’m all ears about what strategy works best .

     I’ve bought quite a bit from DLRC and a trade or two .   But I’ve never sold through them.   I didn’t understand the fee structure clearly.  


    I’m going to trust the process this time .  Felt comfortable after our discussion .

    If it’s somewhat disappointing then I’ll look for a better way or just stop selling at some point .   But this is a sellers market or so it seems with large volume and high bidding .   Hoping I do fine . 🙏🏻

  • Hi Mark Feld

     After thinking about your question, I’d  have to say it was me .    

     I’ve noticed in coins and guns etc when you put a minimum bid that’s pretty high it often goes till the end with no bidding done.    Yet I’ve noticed the ones that start at $1 often draws a lot of bidders and finishes out better than what the other ones starting bid was.    
      The reserves I have used in the past were all easily surpassed .  Had they sold at those numbers it would have been disappointing.

     I’m all ears about what strategy works best .

     I’ve bought quite a bit from DLRC and a trade or two .   But I’ve never sold through them.   I didn’t understand the fee structure clearly.  


    I’m going to trust the process this time .  Felt comfortable after our discussion .

    If it’s somewhat disappointing then I’ll look for a better way or just stop selling at some point .   But this is a sellers market or so it seems with large volume and high bidding .   Hoping I do fine . 🙏🏻
    I generally recommend no-reserve sales. It’s undeniable that reserves tend to diminish bidder interest, enthusiasm and bids.

    Additionally, if a consignor sets a low reserve, it can cause some bidders to think the coin might be worth less than it actually is. On the other hand, a high (or even a relatively reasonable) reserve will cause many bidders to skip to the next lot, without a second thought.

    In rare cases, I do recommend reserves, however. Among them are for esoteric coins for which the market is thin. Another instance is when a consignor is especially nervous - a reserve might be warranted, in order to give him/her some peace of mind.

    The bottom line is that reserves can often result in lower (rather than higher) prices realized or no-sales.

    My above comments are based upon my experiences as a bidder in numerous auctions over a long period of time, as well as my working with consignors.
  • MarkFeld said:
    Hi Mark Feld

     After thinking about your question, I’d  have to say it was me .    

     I’ve noticed in coins and guns etc when you put a minimum bid that’s pretty high it often goes till the end with no bidding done.    Yet I’ve noticed the ones that start at $1 often draws a lot of bidders and finishes out better than what the other ones starting bid was.    
      The reserves I have used in the past were all easily surpassed .  Had they sold at those numbers it would have been disappointing.

     I’m all ears about what strategy works best .

     I’ve bought quite a bit from DLRC and a trade or two .   But I’ve never sold through them.   I didn’t understand the fee structure clearly.  


    I’m going to trust the process this time .  Felt comfortable after our discussion .

    If it’s somewhat disappointing then I’ll look for a better way or just stop selling at some point .   But this is a sellers market or so it seems with large volume and high bidding .   Hoping I do fine . 🙏🏻
    I generally recommend no-reserve sales. It’s undeniable that reserves tend to diminish bidder interest, enthusiasm and bids. Additionally, if a consignor sets a low reserve, it can cause some bidders to think the coin might be worth less than it actually is. On the other hand, a high (or even a relatively reasonable) reserve will cause many bidders to skip to the next lot, without a second thought. In rare cases, I do recommend reserves, however. Among them are for esoteric coins for which the market is thin. Another instance is when a consignor is especially nervous - a reserve might be warranted, in order to give him/her some peace of mind. The bottom line is that reserves can often result in lower (rather than higher) prices realized or no-sales. My above comments are based upon my experiences as a bidder in numerous auctions over a long period of time, as well as my working with consignors.


    Thank you Mark , it seems my gut was correct then.   You worded what I wanted to say much better.   I always appreciate your questions and input.  👍🏻🙏🏻
  • edited June 13
    MarkFeld said:


    Hi Mark Feld

     After thinking about your question, I’d  have to say it was me .    

     I’ve noticed in coins and guns etc when you put a minimum bid that’s pretty high it often goes till the end with no bidding done.    Yet I’ve noticed the ones that start at $1 often draws a lot of bidders and finishes out better than what the other ones starting bid was.    
      The reserves I have used in the past were all easily surpassed .  Had they sold at those numbers it would have been disappointing.

     I’m all ears about what strategy works best .

     I’ve bought quite a bit from DLRC and a trade or two .   But I’ve never sold through them.   I didn’t understand the fee structure clearly.  


    I’m going to trust the process this time .  Felt comfortable after our discussion .

    If it’s somewhat disappointing then I’ll look for a better way or just stop selling at some point .   But this is a sellers market or so it seems with large volume and high bidding .   Hoping I do fine . 🙏🏻
    I generally recommend no-reserve sales. It’s undeniable that reserves tend to diminish bidder interest, enthusiasm and bids.

    Additionally, if a consignor sets a low reserve, it can cause some bidders to think the coin might be worth less than it actually is. On the other hand, a high (or even a relatively reasonable) reserve will cause many bidders to skip to the next lot, without a second thought.

    In rare cases, I do recommend reserves, however. Among them are for esoteric coins for which the market is thin. Another instance is when a consignor is especially nervous - a reserve might be warranted, in order to give him/her some peace of mind.

    The bottom line is that reserves can often result in lower (rather than higher) prices realized or no-sales.

    My above comments are based upon my experiences as a bidder in numerous auctions over a long period of time, as well as my working with consignors.





    Makes absolutely perfect sense. Thinly traded markets have different rules across most any business.



  • edited June 14
    deleted
  • I vote for GC. ;)

    - Ian
  • I vote for GC. ;)

    - Ian

    There is nothing I admire more, than an honest person standing up for their own self, and doing so with humor in lieu of haughtiness.
  • ptolemyII said:

    deleted

    Oh, c'mon now, be yourself. I am rooting for you.
  • I might consider consigning the two gold bean coins to GC. I’d see what CAC will offer on the others that stickered as you will take a bath after the auction house(s) take their commissions. I’d try flipping the others on the PCGS forum.

    I don't envision a downside, to your plan.
  • I vote for GC. ;) - Ian


    Me too !!!    For all coins !!! 👍🏻😎🤗
  • john said:

    I might consider consigning the two gold bean coins to GC. I’d see what CAC will offer on the others that stickered as you will take a bath after the auction house(s) take their commissions. I’d try flipping the others on the PCGS forum.

    I don't envision a downside, to your plan.
    Eager to see what happens with the latest BOX of stuff I sent to GC.
    CAC gold and all...... B)
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