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Will a corrosion speck nix a sticker on an ms64 coin?

edited July 12 in Grading


There's a minor speck in D in GOD and just above Trust in T.

Comments

  • I can't answer your question but I think that coin has great color.
  • Is there also something at the topmost T in TRUST?
  • edited July 12
    Top (first) T has no issue. Above the second T is the corrosion spot. These are very minor and I don't mind them (on a 64rd). This is the Jack Lee coin which sold in 2017 I think so not sure if it went to CAC before the auction but perhaps.
  • Thanks Bushmaster.
  • The impact of a corrosion spot on a coin’s value, aesthetic appeal and its slab grade depends a great deal on several factors:
    1. The size of the corr spot and whether it is “ dead” or still active ( bright green)
    2. The spot’s placement - obv or rev, in field or on a design feature
    3. Whether the spot immed “ rivets” a viewer’s attention or is only obvious upon 2nd / 3rd glance or only under magnification
    4. Whether it is on an otherwise common coin in similar grade or is on a rare or really rare coin whereby it dwindles into very low importance
    5. Whether it is on a copper, nickel, silver or gold coin or on wht metal/ lead or aluminum where corr spots are prolific

    Whatever the case, never ever try to remove it with a sharp instrument as soo many coins have been ruined with spot pin scratches . Sometimes the dark corrosion spot is a waxy particle adhering to the metal in which case a wood toothpick dipped in coin oil may
    carefully “ nudge” the particle loose. So examine the “ spot” closely with a strong magn glass before doing anything







  • mellado said:

    The impact of a corrosion spot on a coin’s value, aesthetic appeal and its slab grade depends a great deal on several factors:
    1. The size of the corr spot and whether it is “ dead” or still active ( bright green)
    2. The spot’s placement - obv or rev, in field or on a design feature
    3. Whether the spot immed “ rivets” a viewer’s attention or is only obvious upon 2nd / 3rd glance or only under magnification
    4. Whether it is on an otherwise common coin in similar grade or is on a rare or really rare coin whereby it dwindles into very low importance
    5. Whether it is on a copper, nickel, silver or gold coin or on wht metal/ lead or aluminum where corr spots are prolific

    Whatever the case, never ever try to remove it with a sharp instrument as soo many coins have been ruined with spot pin scratches . Sometimes the dark corrosion spot is a waxy particle adhering to the metal in which case a wood toothpick dipped in coin oil may
    carefully “ nudge” the particle loose. So examine the “ spot” closely with a strong magn glass before doing anything







    This is a good post. Are you affiliated with any TPGS? It would be nice to know if JA and TPGS agree or if they would add anything.
  • Insider3 said:

    mellado said:

    The impact of a corrosion spot on a coin’s value, aesthetic appeal and its slab grade depends a great deal on several factors:
    1. The size of the corr spot and whether it is “ dead” or still active ( bright green)
    2. The spot’s placement - obv or rev, in field or on a design feature
    3. Whether the spot immed “ rivets” a viewer’s attention or is only obvious upon 2nd / 3rd glance or only under magnification
    4. Whether it is on an otherwise common coin in similar grade or is on a rare or really rare coin whereby it dwindles into very low importance
    5. Whether it is on a copper, nickel, silver or gold coin or on wht metal/ lead or aluminum where corr spots are prolific

    Whatever the case, never ever try to remove it with a sharp instrument as soo many coins have been ruined with spot pin scratches . Sometimes the dark corrosion spot is a waxy particle adhering to the metal in which case a wood toothpick dipped in coin oil may
    carefully “ nudge” the particle loose. So examine the “ spot” closely with a strong magn glass before doing anything







    This is a good post. Are you affiliated with any TPGS? It would be nice to know if JA and TPGS agree or if they would add anything.
    It may assist if you state your affiliation, also.
  • I agree with Mellado’s first comment. If it’s bright green and “ active “ it’s a major detriment. It’s by far more important than 2-5 combined. JA 
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