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Dates Whose Entire Mintages Are Major Doubled Dies

edited September 7 in General
Why not complete a CAC set of these undervalued, small mintage, dramatic varieties? Feel free to add to this list but do not include minor doubled dies like 1944 quarters.

2C 1871 Proof

10C 1942/1 (a doubled die, not a real overdate)

S$1 1844

G$1 1889

$2.50 1891






Comments

  • 1876-CC 20 cent
  • Hambone said:

    1876-CC 20 cent

    Thank you; the 1876-CC 20C is a GREAT example of the topic. It has super strong die doubling that effects the entire mintage (only one die pair was actually used although five other obverse dies and three other reverse dies were shipped but destroyed). It slipped my mind because I have never owned one but have bought and sold many of each of the others.
  • edited September 14
    What about the 1866 S$1 motto business strikes?  DDR.
     Including 1866 through 1873 DDR, same reverse die was used on each year. 
         I might be wrong but I am pretty sure, so double check me and let me know.
     
       I  used to own a beautiful 1866 MS and  1868  proof. I sure miss those two coins, should never had sold them!
  • WilliamJ said:

    What about the 1866 S$1 motto business strikes?  DDR.
     Including 1866 through 1873 DDR, same reverse die was used on each year. 
         I might be wrong but I am pretty sure, so double check me and let me know.
     
       I  used to own a beautiful 1866 MS and  1868  proof. I sure miss those two coins, should never had sold them!

    Is that considered a major doubled die? I see slight doubling at the motto.
  • Personaly I am not real sure if it is major or minor? Also, they have doubling in the eagle feathers.
  • QUESTION for CACfan:

    "10C 1942/1 (a doubled die, not a real overdate)"

    Please explain. Thanks in advance.
  • Insider3 said:

    QUESTION for CACfan:

    "10C 1942/1 (a doubled die, not a real overdate)"

    Please explain. Thanks in advance.

    The 1941 and 1942 hubs were used to make the 1942/1 die, hence the doubled die moniker. Some purists would define a true overdate as being hand punched and not accept a doubled die as an overdate.

    Ditto for the 1942/1-D although a different die pair was used.

  • Dear CACfan,

    Please take more time to explain what you posted as I don't understand the process you have described. Two working hubs made one working die? What came first? What were the steps involved and in what order to end up with a single 1942/1 die?

    Apparently you believe a 1941 die made from a 1941 hub was ANNEALED and then impressed by a 1942 working hub? Or, did the reverse happen?

    Thanks in advance! I'm sure I'm not the only one here who had no clue to this.
  • I just found where your information came from. I respect David Lange's opinion and need to read it so you don't need to answer my question. The only important thing to me is Lange's source. I shall try to find out for myself. Thanks for giving me an interesting project! :)
  • Insider3 said:

    I just found where your information came from. I respect David Lange's opinion and need to read it so you don't need to answer my question. The only important thing to me is Lange's source. I shall try to find out for myself. Thanks for giving me an interesting project! :)

    Lange has nothing to do with it. It has been common knowledge for years. Because only one die pair was used to the max but not overused, you can extrapolate its mintage to be 60,000 to 80,000, the maximum contemporary die life, which seems to proportionally jive with the difference in population between it and the 264,000 mintage 1916-D, assuming that the survival rate is the same.

    If have you have ever been a retailer, you know that the 1942/1 is among the most popular coins on the planet. But the 1942/1-D is a tough sell, obviously because it is not nearly as dramatic.
  • CACfan added: "Lange has nothing to do with it."

    Actually, in his book, Lange has quoted information from the MINT about how THEY BELIEVE the 42/1 dime could happen. The rest of your post (I deleted it here) has nothing to do with how the overdate was made but thanks for the effort. <3
  • Insider3 said:

    CACfan added: "Lange has nothing to do with it."

    Actually, in his book, Lange has quoted information from the MINT about how THEY BELIEVE the 42/1 dime could happen. The rest of your post (I deleted it here) has nothing to do with how the overdate was made but thanks for the effort.

    I believe that John Sinnock explained that the mint in September 1941 began preparing does for 1942. In these months, it became imperative that the hubs for the two years were separated. He speculated that at some point, a die must have been hubbed with a 1941 hub, and finished with a 1942 hub. This could be considered either a doubled die or an overdate.

    I believe CACfan was saying that "true" overdates only happen when the date punches were used for each individual dies, and the date punch was offset on the second or third blow. I believe his stance is that since the date was on the hub, it's a doubled die, not an overdate.
  • Thanks. I read what you posted id in Lange's book. I also understand what you and CACfan posted about how a "true" overdate is made.

    Until last week, I had no idea that the existing theory was that the hub for that coin was struck with a hub of a different date. I'll accept that for now but It seems strange to me this could happen.
  • Insider3 said:

    Thanks. I read what you posted id in Lange's book. I also understand what you and CACfan posted about how a "true" overdate is made.

    Until last week, I had no idea that the existing theory was that the hub for that coin was struck with a hub of a different date. I'll accept that for now but It seems strange to me this could happen.

    If you like varieties as much as I do, the online ANACS Population Report lists many obscure ones not listed elsewhere, although not as many as they did in their (extinct) hard copies. As you no doubt know, PCGS will recognize ANY variety if they agree with the attribution but call it "minor" if unlisted in a major references.
  • CACfan said:

    If you like varieties as much as I do, the online ANACS Population Report lists many obscure ones not listed elsewhere, although not as many as they did in their (extinct) hard copies. As you no doubt know, PCGS will recognize ANY variety if they agree with the attribution but call it "minor" if unlisted in a major references.
    Anacs online pop site looks good. Nice site. Thanks for letting us know.
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