The Most Interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time? — Welcome to the CAC Educational Forum

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

The Most Interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time?

An 1850 or 1849 $20 Lib with the adopted design but without the date. Made of gold-plated copper. One known. No price history. The gold plating was done before striking so CAC accepted it. Apparently ex-Farouk hence the cleaning hairlines but PCGS and CAC probably relaxed their standards for this prestigious coin. There is also a silver version.


«1

Comments

  • edited September 21
    I agree with everything in your post except for...

    The coin doesn't necessarily strike me as "the most interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time".

    I don't necessarily think it's "relatively cheap". We don't even have a good idea regarding what it will bring, yet.

    Many coins have "cleaning hairlines" and contrary to what some people mistakenly believe, many Farouk coins weren't cleaned.

    Not having viewed the coin in hand, I wouldn't assume that "PCGS and CAC probably relaxed their standards for this prestigious coin."
  • Cool it is
    Cheap it ain’t 
  • edited September 21
    Deleted - duplicate post.

  • MarkFeld said:

    I agree with everything in your post except for...

    The coin doesn't necessarily strike me as "the most interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time".

    I don't necessarily think it's "relatively cheap".

    Many coins have "cleaning hairlines" and contrary to what some people mistakenly believe, many Farouk coins weren't cleaned.

    Not having viewed the coin in hand, I wouldn't assume that "PCGS and CAC probably relaxed their standards for this prestigious coin."

    MY REPLY: Thank you for the info.
  • MarkFeld said:

    I agree with everything in your post except for...

    The coin doesn't necessarily strike me as "the most interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time".

    I don't necessarily think it's "relatively cheap". We don't even have a good idea regarding what it will bring, yet.

    Many coins have "cleaning hairlines" and contrary to what some people mistakenly believe, many Farouk coins weren't cleaned.

    Not having viewed the coin in hand, I wouldn't assume that "PCGS and CAC probably relaxed their standards for this prestigious coin."

    FULL REPLY: Similar patterns have auctioned for $30,000 to $50,000. It is a "lowly" pattern, after all, so it will likely not even crack six figures. So yes, it will probably be relatively cheap for its intrigue level compared to the many six, seven, and eight figure coins recently sold.

    The TrueViews show an extremely unnatural brightness, so I definitely believe that CAC and PCGS relaxed their standards just as they seemed to have done for other prestigious coins.

    Many of the patterns that I have owned had a similar "pattern" of profuse hairlines seemingly unique to Farouk patterns, even though his pedigree was not on the TPG insert. His "coin conserver", as he put it, ruined many a coin in the same way. But I was unaware that some in his collection were spared from this abuse.
  • CACfan said:

    MarkFeld said:

    I agree with everything in your post except for...

    The coin doesn't necessarily strike me as "the most interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time".

    I don't necessarily think it's "relatively cheap". We don't even have a good idea regarding what it will bring, yet.

    Many coins have "cleaning hairlines" and contrary to what some people mistakenly believe, many Farouk coins weren't cleaned.

    Not having viewed the coin in hand, I wouldn't assume that "PCGS and CAC probably relaxed their standards for this prestigious coin."

    FULL REPLY: Similar patterns have auctioned for $30,000 to $50,000. It is a "lowly" pattern, after all, so it will likely not even crack six figures. So yes, it will probably be relatively cheap for its intrigue level compared to the many six, seven, and eight figure coins recently sold.

    The TrueViews show an extremely unnatural brightness, so I definitely believe that CAC and PCGS relaxed their standards just as they seemed to have done for other prestigious coins.

    Many of the patterns that I have owned had a similar "pattern" of profuse hairlines seemingly unique to Farouk patterns, even though his pedigree was not on the TPG insert. His "coin conserver", as he put it, ruined many a coin in the same way. But I was unaware that some in his collection were spared from this abuse.
    If similar patterns have sold for $30,000 to $50,000, which is five figures, why would this one seem cheap if it doesn't bring six figures?

    Regardless, what does "it will probably be relatively cheap for its intrigue level compared to the many six, seven, and eight figure coins recently sold' have to do with your original question/point of "The Most Interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time?"

    It's difficult to agree with you when you use hyperbole, as you tend to do.
  • MarkFeld said:

    CACfan said:

    MarkFeld said:

    I agree with everything in your post except for...

    The coin doesn't necessarily strike me as "the most interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time".

    I don't necessarily think it's "relatively cheap". We don't even have a good idea regarding what it will bring, yet.

    Many coins have "cleaning hairlines" and contrary to what some people mistakenly believe, many Farouk coins weren't cleaned.

    Not having viewed the coin in hand, I wouldn't assume that "PCGS and CAC probably relaxed their standards for this prestigious coin."

    FULL REPLY: Similar patterns have auctioned for $30,000 to $50,000. It is a "lowly" pattern, after all, so it will likely not even crack six figures. So yes, it will probably be relatively cheap for its intrigue level compared to the many six, seven, and eight figure coins recently sold.

    The TrueViews show an extremely unnatural brightness, so I definitely believe that CAC and PCGS relaxed their standards just as they seemed to have done for other prestigious coins.

    Many of the patterns that I have owned had a similar "pattern" of profuse hairlines seemingly unique to Farouk patterns, even though his pedigree was not on the TPG insert. His "coin conserver", as he put it, ruined many a coin in the same way. But I was unaware that some in his collection were spared from this abuse.
    If similar patterns have sold for $30,000 to $50,000, which is five figures, why would this one seem cheap if it doesn't bring six figures?

    Regardless, what does "it will probably be relatively cheap for its intrigue level compared to the many six, seven, and eight figure coins recently sold' have to do with your original question/point of "The Most Interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time?"

    It's difficult to agree with you when you use hyperbole, as you tend to do.
    MY REPLY: My point was that five figures is cheap compared to NON-pattern six, seven, and eight figure coins which to me (and probably others) are no more interesting.

    Disagreement does not equate to hyperbole. And what law says that you must agree with everything that someone posts?

    And speaking of "hyperbole", what do you think causes some coins to achieve such staggeringly high auction prices? The unique 1870-S half dime is probably worth even more than its current $2 million PCGS Price Guide value and certainly more than its most recent $661,250 auction price, but do you really think that the common 1938-S dime in MS68+FB CAC (top pop) was actually worth the $364,250 for which it auctioned in 2019? Its then-PCGS Price Guide worth was merely $4,750 in MS68FB.

    I doubt that many retailers will always agree with any ex-TPG grader/auction company employee.
  • te·di·ous
    /ˈtēdēəs/
    adjective
    too long, slow, or dull; tiresome or monotonous.
    "a tedious journey"
  • Pyrite said:

    te·di·ous
    /ˈtēdēəs/
    adjective
    too long, slow, or dull; tiresome or monotonous.
    "a tedious journey"

    The definition of the U.S. Mint.
  • Pyrite said:

    te·di·ous
    /ˈtēdēəs/
    adjective
    too long, slow, or dull; tiresome or monotonous.
    "a tedious journey"

    Ex-TPG grader Feld disagreed with my retailer opinion. Why would you expect it not to be tedious?
  • CACfan said:

    MarkFeld said:

    CACfan said:

    MarkFeld said:

    I agree with everything in your post except for...

    The coin doesn't necessarily strike me as "the most interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time".

    I don't necessarily think it's "relatively cheap". We don't even have a good idea regarding what it will bring, yet.

    Many coins have "cleaning hairlines" and contrary to what some people mistakenly believe, many Farouk coins weren't cleaned.

    Not having viewed the coin in hand, I wouldn't assume that "PCGS and CAC probably relaxed their standards for this prestigious coin."

    FULL REPLY: Similar patterns have auctioned for $30,000 to $50,000. It is a "lowly" pattern, after all, so it will likely not even crack six figures. So yes, it will probably be relatively cheap for its intrigue level compared to the many six, seven, and eight figure coins recently sold.

    The TrueViews show an extremely unnatural brightness, so I definitely believe that CAC and PCGS relaxed their standards just as they seemed to have done for other prestigious coins.

    Many of the patterns that I have owned had a similar "pattern" of profuse hairlines seemingly unique to Farouk patterns, even though his pedigree was not on the TPG insert. His "coin conserver", as he put it, ruined many a coin in the same way. But I was unaware that some in his collection were spared from this abuse.
    If similar patterns have sold for $30,000 to $50,000, which is five figures, why would this one seem cheap if it doesn't bring six figures?

    Regardless, what does "it will probably be relatively cheap for its intrigue level compared to the many six, seven, and eight figure coins recently sold' have to do with your original question/point of "The Most Interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time?"

    It's difficult to agree with you when you use hyperbole, as you tend to do.
    MY REPLY: My point was that five figures is cheap compared to NON-pattern six, seven, and eight figure coins which to me (and probably others) are no more interesting.

    Disagreement does not equate to hyperbole. And what law says that you must agree with everything that someone posts?

    And speaking of "hyperbole", what do you think causes some coins to achieve such staggeringly high auction prices? The unique 1870-S half dime is probably worth even more than its current $2 million PCGS Price Guide value and certainly more than its most recent $661,250 auction price, but do you really think that the common 1938-S dime in MS68+FB CAC (top pop) was actually worth the $364,250 for which it auctioned in 2019? Its then-PCGS Price Guide worth was merely $4,750 in MS68FB.

    I doubt that many retailers will always agree with any ex-TPG grader/auction company employee.
    Agreement or disagreement, "The Most Interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time?" sounds like hyperbole to me.
  • MarkFeld said:

    CACfan said:

    MarkFeld said:

    CACfan said:

    MarkFeld said:

    I agree with everything in your post except for...

    The coin doesn't necessarily strike me as "the most interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time".

    I don't necessarily think it's "relatively cheap". We don't even have a good idea regarding what it will bring, yet.

    Many coins have "cleaning hairlines" and contrary to what some people mistakenly believe, many Farouk coins weren't cleaned.

    Not having viewed the coin in hand, I wouldn't assume that "PCGS and CAC probably relaxed their standards for this prestigious coin."

    FULL REPLY: Similar patterns have auctioned for $30,000 to $50,000. It is a "lowly" pattern, after all, so it will likely not even crack six figures. So yes, it will probably be relatively cheap for its intrigue level compared to the many six, seven, and eight figure coins recently sold.

    The TrueViews show an extremely unnatural brightness, so I definitely believe that CAC and PCGS relaxed their standards just as they seemed to have done for other prestigious coins.

    Many of the patterns that I have owned had a similar "pattern" of profuse hairlines seemingly unique to Farouk patterns, even though his pedigree was not on the TPG insert. His "coin conserver", as he put it, ruined many a coin in the same way. But I was unaware that some in his collection were spared from this abuse.
    If similar patterns have sold for $30,000 to $50,000, which is five figures, why would this one seem cheap if it doesn't bring six figures?

    Regardless, what does "it will probably be relatively cheap for its intrigue level compared to the many six, seven, and eight figure coins recently sold' have to do with your original question/point of "The Most Interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time?"

    It's difficult to agree with you when you use hyperbole, as you tend to do.
    MY REPLY: My point was that five figures is cheap compared to NON-pattern six, seven, and eight figure coins which to me (and probably others) are no more interesting.

    Disagreement does not equate to hyperbole. And what law says that you must agree with everything that someone posts?

    And speaking of "hyperbole", what do you think causes some coins to achieve such staggeringly high auction prices? The unique 1870-S half dime is probably worth even more than its current $2 million PCGS Price Guide value and certainly more than its most recent $661,250 auction price, but do you really think that the common 1938-S dime in MS68+FB CAC (top pop) was actually worth the $364,250 for which it auctioned in 2019? Its then-PCGS Price Guide worth was merely $4,750 in MS68FB.

    I doubt that many retailers will always agree with any ex-TPG grader/auction company employee.
    Agreement or disagreement, "The Most Interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time?" sounds like hyperbole to me.
    The question is an exercise in illogical logic, I think.
  • YOU SAID: Agreement or disagreement, "The Most Interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time?" sounds like hyperbole to me.

    MY REPLY: You do not know the definition of hyperbole.



  • edited September 23
    CACfan said:

    YOU SAID: Agreement or disagreement, "The Most Interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time?" sounds like hyperbole to me.

    MY REPLY: You do not know the definition of hyperbole.



    “hyperbole
    a way of speaking or writing that makes someone or something sound much bigger, better, smaller, worse, more unusual, etc., than they are”

    I guess that as far as you’re concerned,
    “The most” and “of all time” in this thread’s title don’t qualify.

    I’ve wasted too much time conversing with you. So unless I forget, this will be the last time that I reply to any of your posts. Post away.
  • I can say that $30k is roughly 60 times more than I would even consider paying for any reasonably priced coin. There are many adjectives for that coin, but "relatively cheap" is certainly not one.
  • I would go with relatively expensive to describe that coin.
  • MarkFeld said:

    CACfan said:

    YOU SAID: Agreement or disagreement, "The Most Interesting Relatively Cheap CAC Coin of All Time?" sounds like hyperbole to me.

    MY REPLY: You do not know the definition of hyperbole.



    “hyperbole
    a way of speaking or writing that makes someone or something sound much bigger, better, smaller, worse, more unusual, etc., than they are”

    I guess that as far as you’re concerned,
    “The most” and “of all time” in this thread’s title don’t qualify.

    I’ve wasted too much time conversing with you. So unless I forget, this will be the last time that I reply to any of your posts. Post away.
    MY REPLY: Apparently, you missed the question mark in the title of my OP. Thus, I was not making a definitive statement based on hard science; I was merely giving my opinion based on facts previously stated.
  • All I want to know is you can be forgiven for confusing Mark Felt with Mark Feld.

    I am old. I know things, you know...

  • john said:

    All I want to know is you can be forgiven for confusing Mark Felt with Mark Feld.

    I am old. I know things, you know...

    MY REPLY: I suspect that 90% of those who post hereon are over age 70. The average age of Coin World readers was 72 at last check. A 60-year-old coin collector is a spring chicken.

    And I actually have confused Mark Feld with Mark Feldman in the past. Oops!
  • I would go with relatively expensive to describe that coin.

    The highest auction price for a copper pattern that I remember is around $75,000 or so, still relatively cheap considering the intrigue and rarity.
Sign In or Register to comment.