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What About those Numbers on the Label?

As collectors and/or dealers, are the numbers located at the bottom of the coin holder label (typically displayed near or above the barcode) relevant to you? Do you think most hobbyists understand what this information means, or is it seen by most as undecipherable clutter? The TPG companies display this data differently, so I'm curious to know what you think is actually pertinent.

Question: Regarding those numbers on the label, how much of it is necessary?

(a) All of it!
(b) Some of it (please specify what and why)
(c) None of it!
(d) Wait, what numbers?

I'm interested in hearing your thoughts. Thanks!
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Comments

  • edited November 2022
    Cert #’s obviously - so we can know ownership of coin and distinguish them from one another . 

    The Coin catalog number isn’t necessary to me and the grade following it ( on PCGS slabs ) is redundant as it is listed above on the label 
  • edited November 2022

    In the case of the numbers on the above PCGS holder, I believe they are very important to a great many of us. Quick/easy access to the PCGS coin number (7294) allows us to look up that coin number to research auction prices realized, current bids, price guide values, (edited to add: population data, too), etc. Additionally, seeing the PCGS cert number (35592956) allows for a quick cert verification check.

    The same goes with respect to the NGC cert number on the below pictured coin.


  • I agree with Mark above. The certification number is an absolute mandatory in order to quickly distinguish the uniqueness of the coin. It makes it easy to look up and verify the specific coin/holder in question.

    As far as what PCGS does including their catalogue number along with the assigned grade is just extra information. I would assume that CAC will be assigning a catalogue number to each coin via denomination/date/mm/variety? If this is the case, that number might be useful on the reverse of the label along with any other pertinent information regarding the coin. One thing I do like about PCGS is they use a code in the grade position following the coin number for details grades, this can be useful if the problem is not described clearly on the front of the label where the Straight Graded grade would appear.

    I do like the simplistic approach by NGC with a serial number that matches the submission followed by the -001 to indicate what position the coin was on the submission. So having 20 coins submitted you have a single submission number 1234567 followed by a -001 up to -020.

    Personally I don't mind either approach. I just know that at a bare minimum, there needs to be a unique serial number on the front of the slab.
  • I don't like the numbers, or at least the numbers on the front. But maybe I need to learn Mark's trick for quickly looking up auction history based on the coin number.
  • edited November 2022
    The slab serial number is all that is needed. Just enter it at the TPG website and it will take you to the series info. The serial number for the coin series is unnecessary clutter.
  • I don't like the numbers, or at least the numbers on the front. But maybe I need to learn Mark's trick for quickly looking up auction history based on the coin number.

    You can also use the PCGS coin number for quick access to their population data. I will add that to my previous post.
  • The unique certification number is the only one that is needed (along with the date, denomination, and grade).   I don't think the barcode is necessary on the front.  
  • edited November 2022
    pedzola said:

    The unique certification number is the only one that is needed (along with the date, denomination, and grade).   I don't think the barcode is necessary on the front.  

    The barcode can be scanned I believe? so if you have a boatload of coins to check you don't have to type in the info. Would think many find it useful ? Are you saying put it on the back? or eliminate it?
  • Set-up RFID equipped slabs and we can just tap the slab on a reader get all the info and do sales transactions as well.
  • I think a numbering system is necessary to set up a set registry.

    Serial numbers are an absolute necessity. A unique serial number to differentiate one coin from another in dealer stock, so buyers of sight unseen coins can verify the serial numbers, and so they can be added/removed from a set registry.


    In my opinion the reason people favor PCGS coins is the ability to add them to registry sets and specialty sets. Low populations and set competition are what I believe generates the premium for PCGS coins. NGC coins seems to be less desirable since they allow PCGS coins in their competitive registry sets.
  • I like the bar code on the front so you can scan without having the dealer pull it out or something. The grade. The grading company before the grade... we knew it was pcgs when we looked at it. Didn't need the pcgs before au50 really. Other than that year and mm.
  • edited November 2022
    I think most serious hobbyists understand what this information means. However, as Vincent mentioned the grade following the coin catalog number is redundant. CAC is prominent inside the bean and in the background therefore PCGS in front of the grade is not needed.

  • I know I only use the cert number, but thought wholesalers use the catalog numbers preluding to check coin pricing data via their softwares.
  • I think the cert number and coin number are important and should be on the front of the slab. Repeating the grade is not necessary.
    Thank you Mark for suggesting using the coin number for the pop report, price guide, etc. Much faster!
  • The serial number is nice to have for sure. The coin identifier can be relegated to the back of the label. I like what PNG and others have done and out detail explanations on the back to clarify why the front said details.
  • IMHO, better to just have ONE QR code on the Front of the slab
    Much better data on a QR code, and much cleaner looking than a bar code. RFID to me is a great security feature and would definitely add it
  • IMHO, better to just have ONE QR code on the Front of the slab
    Much better data on a QR code, and much cleaner looking than a bar code. RFID to me is a great security feature and would definitely add it

    I was thinking similarly. Bar codes take a lot of space and QR is commonly enough supported now. NFC of some sort would also be ideal and skip codes entirely.
  • A lot of older generation collectors don't use cell phones. I am sure there are others that are younger that don't have cell phones, either.
  • john said:

    A lot of older generation collectors don't use cell phones. I am sure there are others that are younger that don't have cell phones, either.

    Bar code wouldn’t help them either, then.
  • The bar code usually has numbers, no? And, can be looked up on line, and older does not mean incapable of one finger typing. I know stuff.

    "Them"? I see.....
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